Tuesday, November 27, 2018

|Podcast| Poppies - Myles Yaksich


Photo Content from Myles Yaksich

Poppies is Myles Yaksich's directorial debut and entrance to the film industry.

The film is based on his experiences living and working abroad. Through a cultural lens, Poppies explores universal themes of love and life. When a young expat working in Shanghai meets an elderly Chinese woman, he is forced to face his struggles; what has he sacrificed in the pursuit of his dreams?

Born in Canada, he learned at a young age to travel and appreciate art and culture. After completing his degree in Finance and Economics, he pursued investment banking in Singapore and private equity in South East Asia.

His goal is to tell sentimental and emotional stories that blur the line between reality and fantasy. Through film and photography, he explores ideas about culture, nature, relationships and socio-economics.



JEANBOOKNERD PODCAST 2018: TWENTY FOUR
GUEST: MYLES YAKSICH
JOURNALIST: ERIK WERLIN
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TEN REASONS TO WATCH POPPIES
  • 1. “Poppies” is a universal story that will take you on a surprising and emotional journey 
  • 2. “Poppies” features mesmerizing performances by Cindera Che (“Fresh Off the Boat”), Matthew Knowles (“Asura”), Kara Wang (“Top Gun: Maverick) and Jonathan Stanton
  • 3. “Poppies” is Myles Yaksich’s award-winning, directorial debut 
  • 4. The cinematography, by Dylan Chapgier, is visually stunning
  • 5. Details are layered into all aspects of the film, including production and costume design
  • 6. There are lush and exotic locations, including a business class trip on “Destined Airways” and a surreal visit to 1940s Shanghai 
  • 7. The music will send shivers down your spine
  • 8. “Poppies” is a conversation starter, exploring cross-cultural and generational issues
  • 9. You’ll leave the film wanting more
  • 10. Multiple award-winning short film, in several categories including Screenplay, Directing, Best Actor and Best Actress, to name a few.


Fate intervenes, when Charles, a young and over-worked American corporate lawyer, finds himself seated beside an elderly Chinese woman with a mysterious past, Auntie Ling on a contemporary flight from Shanghai to New York. 

After noticing the beautiful bouquet of Poppies that Charles has brought onboard the flight, Auntie Ling reminisces about the early years of her marriage to Shu Zhen, an opium trader in 1940s Shanghai, and tries to coax Charles out of his solitude. 

Slowly lured into her stories, Charles begins to see the layers beneath Auntie Ling's polished facade. Poppies brought Charles and Auntie Ling together, underscoring the fine line between joy and sorrow...life and death. 

Influenced by real events, Poppies explores the cross-cultural and cross-generational relationships that develop between strangers in mid-air.


A NOTE FROM THE WRITER / DIRECTOR
At the root of Poppies are the universal ideas of love, fate and destiny, told through a contemporary lens exploring cultural values, age and gender.

Was Charles destined to sit beside Auntie Ling, the one woman who can save him in his time of need? Or was he lucky – had he not brought the poppies on board the flight, what would happen to him?

Like the character of Charles, I was absorbed in a stressful job that left me dispassionate and questioning my values (individual pursuits vs family), and my ideas on types of love. Also like Charles, I was lucky to have met a figure like Auntie Ling in Singapore, a colleague of mine at my first job in an investment bank.

Poppies is a deeply personal story, based upon my experience of living and working in Asia for 7 years and the impression that Asian (and Chinese) culture has left on my perception and values. The film is not only a personal expression of experience, but also an important story for diversity – strengthening the relationship between Asia and America, and supporting the Asian-American community in the entertainment industry.
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