Friday, May 2, 2014

Trouble by Non Pratt Review


Book Nerd Review

In this dazzling debut novel, a pregnant teen learns the meaning of friendship—from the boy who pretends to be her baby’s father.

When the entire high school finds out that Hannah Shepard is pregnant via her ex-best friend, she has a full-on meltdown in her backyard. The one witness (besides the rest of the world): Aaron Tyler, a transfer student and the only boy who doesn’t seem to want to get into Hannah’s pants. Confused and scared, Hannah needs someone to be on her side. Wishing to make up for his own past mistakes, Aaron does the unthinkable and offers to pretend to be the father of Hannah’s unborn baby. Even more unbelievable, Hannah hears herself saying “yes.”

Told in alternating perspectives between Hannah and Aaron, Trouble is the story of two teenagers helping each other to move forward in the wake of tragedy and devastating choices. As you read about their year of loss, regret, and hope, you’ll remember your first, real best friend—and how they were like a first love.


Non Pratt’s very compassionate novel, Trouble, tells the story of fifteen-year-olds, Hannah and Aaron. Hannah is sharp, loves to have fun, and always trying to get the attention she seeks. On the other hand, Aaron is the quiet one and would rather distance himself from the world. They are definitely the most unlikely of friends but when Hannah becomes pregnant, Aaron tells everyone that he’s the father.

The story is fully engaged through Pratt’s approach on delivering alternating point of views between Hannah and Aaron. The dual voices stunningly played off each other and proved to be very effective. The writing style steers and guides the reader smoothly through the storyline. The voices of Hannah and Aaron are realistic. Pratt certainly has done the research to give a genuine heartfelt story. Through the entire ordeal that Hannah has gone through, there was never a time it felt like the story was trying to teach a lesson. Instead, Hannah and Aaron’s story covers all the emotions that the teenage years yield such as love, grief, and lust.

The handling of sensitive issues such as teenage sex never felt like it was judgmental. It was more portrayed as a natural part of growing up. Readers will appreciate how Pratt is not playing the advocate on preventing teenage pregnancy, but makes a valid point on how it is looked down upon girls who enjoy having sex. Trouble has a grippingly premise that will take a hold of you from a story that is very real. It is genuinely brilliant and tells the truth about teenagers’ journey to finding themselves.



You can purchase Trouble at the following Retailers:
    

2 comments:

  1. Well, I am definitely happy that you liked this
    I have been hearing a lot of amazing things about it
    GREAT review
    Your reader
    Soma
    http://insomnia-of-books.blogspot.com/

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    1. Thanks Soma! I hope you'll enjoy it :)

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