Jonathan Friesen

UNFOLDING Official Blog Tour

Erin Lyon

I LOVE YOU SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Barry Wolverton

THE DRAGON'S GATE Official Blog Tour

Mindy Mejia

EVERYTHING YOU WANT ME TO BE

Colleen Houck

REIGNITED Official Blog Tour

Katharine McGee

THE THOUSANDTH FLOOR

Judith Kinghorn

THE ECHO OF TWILIGHT

P.J. Hoover

TUT: MY EPIC BATTLE TO SAVE THE WORLD OFFICIAL BLOG TOUR

Erin Lyon

I LOVE YOU SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Stephanie Morrill

THE LOST GIRL OF ASTOR STREET Official Blog Tour

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Judith Kinghorn Author Interview


Book Nerd Interview

Judith Kinghorn is the author of four novels: The Echo of Twilight, The Snow Globe, The Memory of Lost Senses, and The Last Summer. She was born in Northumberland, educated in the Lake District, and is a graduate in English and History of Art. She lives in Hampshire, England, with her husband and two children.

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What’s one thing that readers would be surprised to find out about you?

I love good science fiction films. (With plenty of popcorn. Salty and sweet).

When did you write your first book and how old were you?

I didn’t begin writing seriously until I was in my forties. By which time I’d had a successful career in business in London, had my children and moved to the country. The move from city to country was very important to me as a way of slowing down and tapping into my creativity. Up until that point, my life had been a bit of a roller-coaster ride and I wanted a different pace – and peace!

I’d waited a long time to write, and perhaps that’s why I more or less wrote two books at the same time. Because my second published novel, The Memory of Lost Senses, was written before my début, The Last Summer. I spent years researching my period, and then another few years writing and rewriting The Memory of Lost Senses. But The Last Summer was different: it was written in the first six months of 2010, sold later that same year, and published in the UK in 2012 - the same year I turned 50!

What was the greatest thing you learned at school?

Well, it certainly wasn’t science, which was in itself something of a black hole to me. But that’s perhaps because it was a subject first taught me by nuns. And nuns and science don’t really go together, do they? And Sister Aiden, the nun who introduced me to physics, chemistry and biology (the latter, allocated the least time, never went near the Human aspect), was not very Godly, good or kind. But that’s another story… which in turn leads me on, because of course stories were my favorite thing, and the greatest thing I learned at school was a love of literature, and the power of imagination.

In English lessons, I could nearly always see the book we were reading. I was there - inside the pages, amidst the drama. And, once transported, once immersed, it wasn’t always easy to reengage with the real world, or with Sister Aiden and her science.

How would you describe yourself in three words?

Dithering about words.

Did you learn anything from writing THE ECHO OF TWILIGHT and what was it?

The power of memory. And that our childhoods, those early landscapes and people, remain with us and do not fade. We carry endless snapshots and slow-reel films with us into the future. And later, if we wish to, they’re there for us to draw on, piece together, and sometimes find meaning and comfort.

What part of Pearl did you enjoy writing the most?

I loved Pearl at all stages! In fact, she’s possibly my most favorite of all my characters. At the start of the novel, I loved her innocent view of the world, and her determination and ambition. And I had fun writing her in the first person: seeing world events unfold through her eyes; telling silly lies, making high-handed and hasty judgments, falling back on Kitty’s old proverbs and superstitions; trying to figure it all out – that way we do when we’re young. And I particularly enjoyed taking her to Northumberland, where I grew up, and then to Scotland – where I spent so much of my childhood.

If you could introduce Ottoline to any character from another book, who would it be and why?

If I had to introduce Ottoline to a character from one of my own books… I think I’d introduce her to Mabel Forbes (The Snow Globe). The two women have a lot in common and I can see them forming a great friendship, and sort of liberating each other; taking trips to Italy together and perhaps even meeting up in Rome with Cora (The Memory of Lost Senses).

If you had to choose, which writer would you consider a mentor?

To narrow it down to only one is almost impossible, because via my reading I’ve had quite a few. And I have to look to those writers who captured me as a reader to know who shaped me as a writer: The Bronte sisters, Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, Rosamond Lehmann, and the wonderful and for so long forgotten author, Elizabeth Taylor. Each of them – and more besides – have influenced and affected me through their work. Each of them have inspired me - lifted me, plunged me, and sometimes left me breathless by the seemingly effortless beauty of their prose. I know I’ll never be able to match their brilliance, but the impetus to try is there!

You have the chance to give one piece of advice to your readers. What would it be?

To read those authors I’ve just mentioned.

Who was your first boyfriend?

Ha, the man I’m married to! But although we dated in our teens, we later broke up and spent about decade apart, and with other people. So it wasn’t until we were a bit older that we got together again and got married. Which just goes to prove, timing is everything!

What are you most passionate about today?

My children, all of our children: their wellbeing and safety in an increasingly troubled world. As I get older, I’m less sure, less opinionated and more considered. And though it’s hard to be contemplative and philosophical about life in a world that demands opinion, demands minute-by-minute updates and reaction on social media, I think the internet and social media are the greatest threat to our wellbeing, and to our ability to engage with ourselves as human beings, and with nature.

If you had to go back in time and change one thing, if you HAD to, even if you had “no regrets” what would it be?

To not be so honest! Particularly in my early career. (I had internship at Vogue – organized by the then editor Beatrix Miller, who later set up numerous interviews for me, and then chastised me for making clear what I did not have – including typing and shorthand: “You should have said yes, and then done one of those crash courses on Oxford Street!”). Ah, the benefit of age and hindsight!

Where can readers stalk you?

On Twitter - @judithkinghorn – where I love to connect with readers and talk about books, or via my Facebook page, where I post news about my own books. Readers can also message me directly via the ‘contact’ page on my website. I reply to every message personally.



From the acclaimed author of The Last Summer, a captivating and moving story of the unlikely relationship between a lady and her maid on the eve of World War I.

As I watched him—his long legs striding the narrow path through the heather, his golden hair catching the sun—I had a hideous feeling in the pit of my stomach. For it seemed as though he was already marching away from me.

In 1914, despite the clouds of war threatening Europe, Pearl Gibson’s future is bright. She has secured a position as a lady’s maid to a wealthy Northumberland aristocrat, a job that will win her not only respect but an opportunity to travel and live in luxury. Her new life at Lady Ottoline Campbell’s Scottish summer estate is a whirlwind of intrigue and glamour, scandals and confidences—and surprisingly, a strange but intimate friendship with her employer.

But when violence erupts in Europe, Pearl and Ottoline’s world is irrevocably changed. As the men in their lives are called to the front lines, leaving them behind to anxiously brace for bad news, Pearl realizes she must share one final secret with her mistress—a secret that will bind them together forever...

PRAISE for The Echo of Twilight

“A gripping tale of family secrets and a comedy of manners...Historical fiction fans will not want to miss this gem!” –Renee Rosen, author of White Collar Girl

“Those who love the blockbuster show Downton Abbey will find much to enjoy.” –Historical Novel Society

You can purchase The Echo of Twilight at the following Retailers:
        


And now, The Giveaways.
Thank you Penguin/Random House for making this giveaway possible.
1 Winner will receive a Copy of The Echo of Twilight by Judith Kinghorn

*JBN is not responsible for Lost or Damaged Books in your Nerdy Mail Box*
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Monday, January 16, 2017

Katharine McGee Author Interview


Book Nerd Interview
Photo Credit: Chris Bailey Photography

Katharine McGee is originally from Houston, Texas. She studied English and French literature at Princeton University and has an MBA from Stanford. It was during her years in New York, working as an editor by day and writing by night, that she began a manuscript about life in a futuristic skyscraper. The Thousandth Floor is her first novel.

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Beyond your own work (of course), what is your all-time favorite book and why? And what is your favorite book outside of your genre?

It’s so hard to pick a favorite! One series that I return to again and again is Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy. I love the universe he’s created, with different worlds layered over one another, so painfully close and yet impossible to reach. Lyra is a flawed protagonist: reckless and impulsive, and dismissive of authority—but also curious and brave, and loyal to the people she cares about. I loved watching her grow up over the course of those three novels.

Aside from fantasy/sci-fi, I love to read historical fiction—especially novels with epic, sweeping drama and a sprawling cast of characters! Wolf Hall and its sequel Bring Up the Bodies were two of my recent favorites.

Why is storytelling so important for all of us?

One of my favorite quotes is “A life without stories would be no life at all.” Stories are literally what make us human. They are the reason we invented language in the first place, to bridge the distance between two people, in some small way. You tell dozens of stories every day without even realizing it: in class, at work, when telling your friend how bad the traffic was or convincing your dad to watch a new tv show! In my opinion, stories are the only real magic that exists; because they enable us to slip out of our lives and into someone else’s—to understand the way that another person sees and experiences the world—for a brief enchanted time. The minute we stop telling and reading stories, we’re doomed.

What is the best piece of advice you ever received from another author?

To not worry when the first draft doesn’t come out perfect (because it never does—in fact, it’s far from it. Thank goodness for editors J) Also, to take a lot of naps on book tour!

In your book; THE THOUSANDTH FLOOR, can you tell my Book Nerd community a little about it?

The Thousandth Floor is set in New York City, a hundred years from now, when most of Manhattan has become an enormous thousand-story skyscraper. The book opens on an unnamed girl falling from the roof of this massive supertower. As the reader, you don’t know who she is or why she’s falling: was it an accident, did she jump off, or was she pushed? The book then backtracks three months, to tell the interlocking stories of five teenagers, leading up to the moment that one girl ends up on the roof…

Although The Thousandth Floor is set in the future, it was important to me not to set it in a dystopia: there’s no cruel dictator or caste system, no battles to the death. Instead, it’s still our world, just fast-forwarded a hundred years both technologically and socially (think computerized contact lenses and hovercrafts and antigravity yoga!). It’s not a utopia either, though, because human nature isn’t perfect. Ultimately, my characters are still motivated by the same things as teenagers today: loneliness and desire and heartbreak and love, and all the other things that make us human.

For those who are unfamiliar with Leda, how would you introduce her?

Leda is proud, manipulative, insecure, and addicted, to a drug that she should give up… and a boy who isn’t good for her. She’s also clever, shockingly insightful, and fiercely loyal to her friends.

What are some of your current and future projects that you can share with us?

The Thousandth Floor is the first in a trilogy, with book 2 coming out in August. I’m almost finished with final edits for that book, and then I’ll get started on book 3!

If you could introduce Watt to any character from another book, who would it be and why?

I read SJ Kinkaid’s Insignia trilogy this year and I have to say, I really wish Watt could meet and befriend Wyatt! (Similar names are completely a coincidence!) They’re both computer geniuses, both misunderstood, and both harbor crushes on people who don’t seem interested… I don’t think Watt and Wyatt would ever work as a couple, but they would definitely be great friends.

What was one of the most surprising things you learned in creating Rylin?

Rylin has a younger sister, Chrissa, and I have a sister named Lizzy who’s eight years younger than me. One of my favorite things about Rylin’s story was seeing what parts of my relationship with Lizzy made their way into Rylin’s feelings about Chrissa. Rylin is incredibly proud, and fiercely protective of, her sister in the way that I am of Lizzy. She would give up anything for her sister—which she does, when their mom passes away and Rylin has to drop out of school to take care of the family. Sisters are also the only people who can deliver the really hard truths. As my mom always says, you can never fool your sister, because she knows you better than anyone else in the world. Which is why I make Chrissa say what she does to Rylin at the end of the book (you’ll understand once you’ve read it)!

What’s the best advice you can give writers to help them develop their own unique voice and style?

Keep reading! Read everything you can get your hands on, not just the same genre, but a wide variety. Your “writing muscle” needs to be stretched the same way you would stretch and workout to train for a marathon (and writing a book is definitely like running a marathon!) I always find it useful to read something outside my comfort zone, especially when I’m stuck. Shakespeare or other classics from my high school and college bookshelf are particularly useful for this. I know a lot of authors who take breaks to read poetry! Anything to help get your brain into a different cadence or sentence structure. The more types of writing you see, the more varied and interesting your own unique voice will become.

What part of Eris did you enjoy writing the most?

Eris’s story was particularly tricky, because she has the most going on over the course of the novel—a family story and a coming-of-age story, not to mention a new romance! I have to say that I particularly loved her birthday party at Bubble Lounge. If only we could drink out of floating bubbles in real life.

What's the most memorable summer job you've ever had?

I went to an all-girls summer camp in Texas for ten years, from age 7 to 16, and then was a counselor for two summers, living in a cabin full of teenagers and teaching horseback riding. It was the most incredible experience of my life, and I wish every summer that I could go back!

Tell me about your first kiss?

As Avery would say, a lady doesn’t kiss and tell ;)

What would be harder for you, to tell someone you love them or that you do not love them back?

I think it would be terrible to have to tell someone who loved you that you didn’t love them back. I’ve actually only ever told one person that I loved him (aside from my family) and he ended up becoming my husband! So that was a very fun “I love you” to say, because he had already said it first, and it all ended happily!

When was the last time you cried?
I’m an easy crier when reading books or watching movies. Just this weekend I watched Harry Potter 7 part 1 with my family, and I definitely shed a few tears when Dobby died at the end. Dobby is a free elf! He got to die fighting with his friends! See, I’m tearing up just writing it right now!

What decade during the last century would you have chosen to be a teenager?

I feel like I would have loved the eighties, all that big hair and neon sparkling clothes and loud music. Though I’m not a fan of the nineties grunge look that followed!

What is your greatest adventure?

I think being in love—really in love, with the person you’re going to spend your life with—is the craziest adventure of all. The moment you stop living your own life for yourself and start building a joint life together is deeply scary, and exciting, and rewarding. My husband and I got married a few months ago, so the journey is only just begun!

Where can readers stalk you?

I’m on Twitter and Instagram at @katharinemcgee, and my website is http://katharinemcgee.com!



NEW YORK CITY AS YOU'VE NEVER SEEN IT BEFORE.

A thousand-story tower stretching into the sky. A glittering vision of the future where anything is possible—if you want it enough.

WELCOME TO MANHATTAN, 2118.

A hundred years in the future, New York is a city of innovation and dreams. Everyone there wants something…and everyone has something to lose.

LEDA COLE’s flawless exterior belies a secret addiction—to a drug she never should have tried and a boy she never should have touched.

ERIS DODD-RADSON’s beautiful, carefree life falls to pieces when a heartbreaking betrayal tears her family apart.

RYLIN MYERS’s job on one of the highest floors sweeps her into a world—and a romance—she never imagined…but will this new life cost Rylin her old one?

WATT BAKRADI is a tech genius with a secret: he knows everything about everyone. But when he’s hired to spy for an upper-floor girl, he finds himself caught up in a complicated web of lies.

And living above everyone else on the thousandth floor is AVERY FULLER, the girl genetically designed to be perfect. The girl who seems to have it all—yet is tormented by the one thing she can never have.

Amid breathtaking advancement and high-tech luxury, five teenagers struggle to find their place at the top of the world. But when you're this high up, there's nowhere to go but down....


PRAISE for The Thousandth Floor

“The luxe lives of Manhattan’s elite are even more extraordinary in Katharine McGee’s futuristic, highly addictive page-turner. The Thousandth Floor will give you vertigo and leave you eager for more.” --Cecily von Ziegesar, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Gossip Girl

“Katharine McGee’s vision of glamorous twenty-second century teens makes for an addictive and compelling read that left me longing for the second installment!” --Alyson Noël, #1 New York Times Author

“Twenty-second century Gossip Girl-like fun. Sexy and engrossing!” --Melissa de la Cruz, #1 New York Times Bestselling Author

“An unparalleled mash-up of romance, mystery, and science fiction unlike anything I’ve read before. Katharine McGee gives the speculative fiction genre a much-needed make-over with a novel that’s as glamorous as it is fiercely intelligent.” --Kass Morgan, New York Times bestselling author of The 100

“A gleaming future where a dirty secret still has pull on any human heart.” --Anna Godbersen, NEW YORK TIMES bestselling author of THE LUXE)

“Compelling and imaginative - I loved everything from the fascinating vision of the future to the scandalous lives of the characters.” --Amy Tintera, author of RUINED

“A confident debut, replete with romance, jealousy, and enticing future fashions and tech, McGee’s story delivers more than enough drama and excitement to hook readers and leave them anticipating the next book in the trilogy.” --Publishers Weekly

“A clever construction, readers who love uncovering scandalous secrets will find themselves staying up late. This is a towering debut.” --Booklist

“This will be gobbled up by fans of “Gossip Girl”. An excellent hook and familiar tropes make this title a likely hit.” --School Library Journal

“McGee has done her work in world building and character development to make a juicy, memorable future that readers will want to revisit.” --Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books

You can purchase The Thousandth Floor at the following Retailers:
        


And now, The Giveaways.
Thank you Katharine for making this giveaway possible.
1 Winner will receive a Signed Copy of The Thousandth Floor 
(The Thousandth Floor #1) by Katharine McGee

*JBN is not responsible for Lost or Damaged Books in your Nerdy Mail Box*
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Thursday, January 12, 2017

Friends ForNever by Melissa Baldwin


Book Nerd Blast

Erin Taylor is a hard-working journalist with a serious TV addiction and lack of a social life. She’s focused on her career and determined to leave her tiny cubicle behind for a fabulous corner office! But when a new co-worker, a friendship drama, and a hot workplace crush collide, Erin finds it harder and harder to focus. Especially when that crush on the oh-so-yummy Aiden Thomas starts to materialize into what feels like a magical relationship. Erin’s life seems to finally be heading in the right direction…until suddenly friends aren’t such great friends after all, her magical relationship hits a bumpy road, and her career could be derailed by it all. Erin learns a lesson the hard way: Sometimes people aren’t who they seem to be. With her happiness on the line, can Erin rise above her disappointments and create the life she’s always dreamed of or will she be stuck being Friends ForNever?

Praise for the Book

Friends ForNever is a cleverly written book that will keep you wanting for more until the very end! I highly recommend this book!

Friends for Never is like listening to your best friend tell you about her day at work! And anyone who has worked in an office will totally relate to this book. I was absolutely sucked in. The love story was great!

It was well paced and funny!
The author is really good.

An intriguing look at the demands of family and friendship when personal goals are at risk.
A novel of back stabbing emotions.


You can purchase Friends ForNever at the following Retailers:
    


Author Spotlight

Melissa graduated from the University of Central Florida with a Bachelor’s Degree in Communications; she has always had a love for writing. An avid journal keeper, she took her creativity to the next level by fulfilling her dream with her debut novel, An Event to Remember . . . Or Forget. Since then, she has written and published four more novels, Wedding Haters, See You Soon Broadway, Not Quite Sheer Happiness and Friends ForNever.

Melissa resides in Orlando, Florida, with her husband and young daughter. When she isn’t writing, this multi-tasking master organizer is busy being a mother, wife, chauffeur, PTA President, and Fitness Trainer.

When she has free time, she enjoys traveling, running, fitness, and taking a Disney Cruise every now and then.

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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Home Sweet Horror by James Preller Review


Book Nerd Review by Jordan

Welcome. Have a seat. Let us tell you a story. But be warned. Home Sweet Horror isn't just any tale. This is a Scary Tale.

Meet Liam Finn, who's just moved into a new home with his father and sister. But this old house that seems empty, isn't . . . Bloody Mary is here. Called back from the dead by a game, she's just dying to talk.





EXCERPT
1

THE HOUSE ON THE HILL

"Wake up, Liam. We're here," Mr. Finn whispered from the driver's seat. "Our new home."

The eight-year-old boy rubbed his eyes, groggy from the long drive. He looked out the car window, blinking into the dark. "What time is it?"

"Around midnight," his father said. "You three have been crashed out for hours."

Liam became aware of the warm body pressed against him. His hand fell on the sleeping dog's neck. On the other side of the dog, Liam's older sister, Kelly, slept with her head pitched forward. Even in sleep, Kelly's hand clutched her necklace. It was once her mother's ring, a parting gift that Kelly wore on a chain around her neck.

"Let her rest," Mr. Finn said, as if reading Liam's mind. "I've been enjoying the peace and quiet." 

Kelly had been against the move. She'd crossed her arms and vowed, "Nuh-uh, I'm not going. I like it here in Hopeville." She'd argued, threw tantrums, said horrible things. But Mr. Finn decided that it was time for a fresh start, and that was that. Their mother would have wanted it this way.

Liam felt his chest tighten at the thought. Even after eighteen months, her memory caused his heart to swell and his breath to grow short and shallow, like the early signs of an asthma attack. He fingered the inhaler in his pocket. Breathe in, breathe out, he told himself. Breathe in, breathe out.

The road was quiet, with dim streetlights and a few darkened homes across the way. Each house was set apart on high, rolling lots, not as crowded as Liam's old neighborhood. He looked back at the battered old house on the hill. It was big, larger than he'd imagined from the photographs. The two windows on the second floor—with half-drawn shades like lazy yellow eyelids—reminded Liam of watchful eyes. He imagined that the house looked down upon them out of those eyes. Looming, waiting, watching. The front door's brass knocker looked like a nose.

The dog, Doolin, rose stiffly on ancient legs. She stretched, sniffed, and whined softly in the dark of night. 

"What's the matter, girl? You need to do your business?"

Liam opened the door. He stepped into a bath of warm, late-summer air. He beckoned to the dog. 

"Come on, girl. Let's check out the new place," Liam urged.

The dog did not budge. Instead, she backed away, pressing into Kelly.

Liam's sister stirred, grumbled. "Shut up, Liam, will ya? I'm trying to sleep."

She pushed the dog away.

Mr. Finn popped the trunk, moved around to the back of the car. The big moving van with all their belongings would be arriving tomorrow. "Don't expect a palace," Mr. Finn called out brightly. He pulled out three sleeping bags, pillows, a flashlight. "It'll be fun, like a camping trip. Just remember, guys. This place needs a lot of work."

A flicker of light caught Liam's eye. He glanced up at the house. And a zipper of fear ran down his spine. Just darkness, silence, and an empty road. It was nothing, he told himself. But the sudden flash appeared again, a flicker of light from one of the windows. On, then off. Liam glanced at his father.

 Mr. Finn didn't see it.

The light came from the window on the right. Maybe my bedroom, Liam guessed. It felt to Liam as if the house's great eye had opened and shut. A wink. As if to say, I know a secret. 

"There's no one inside?" Liam asked.

"Don't be a dweeb," Kelly grumbled. She climbed out of the car, unfolding her long limbs. "I seriously doubt that anybody besides us would live in a dump like this."

Liam ignored Kelly's comment. The death of their mother had changed his sister. Nowadays, she seemed angry all the time. Liam missed his sister, the good times they used to share. These days she shut herself off, spending hours alone in her room. Maybe things would get better in the new place.

Ed Finn put a strong arm around his son's shoulders. "This old house has been empty for two years," he said. "It's a fixer-upper. That's why I got such a great price."

Text copyright © 2013 by James Preller.
Illustrations copyright © 2013 by Iacopo Bruno


This was one of my favorite and scariest book I ever Read! I really enjoyed this book. The scariest part was when they were driving around to find Doolin. Then a lady with long hair and white appeared out of nowhere. That part gave me the chills. I loved the main characters, Kelly Liam, and the Dad. I recommend others to read the scary book.

Here are Jordan's written reviews as he reads per chapter. Just click the picture to enlarge. ***WARNING** Review Contains SPOILERS. Do NOT click the pictures if you do not wish to be Spoiled.



Here are some Illustrations by Iacopo Bruno

 
  

You can purchase Home Sweet Horror at the following Retailers:
    


Author Spotlight

James Preller is the author of the popular Jigsaw Jones mystery books, which have sold more than 10 million copies since 1998. He is also the author of Bystander, named a 2009 Junior Library Guild Selection, Six Innings, an ALA Notable Book, and Mighty Casey, his own twist on the classic poem, “Casey at the Bat.” In addition to writing full-time, Preller plays in a men’s hardball league and coaches Little League. He compares coaching kids to “trying to hold the attention of a herd of earthworms.” He lives in Delmar, New York with his wife, three children, cats and dog.
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